Session 3: Financing

Panel 1: ENABLING THE SUSTAINABLE OCEAN ECONOMY

Background/Objective:

The OECD, G20 countries, the EC and a number of coastal developing countries and island nations have embraced the ocean economy as they capitalize on the ocean’s economic, social and environmental potential.  For the more advanced economies, how did they do it? For developing countries, what opportunities do they foresee, and what challenges are they struggling with? Experiences from countries like France, Sweden, UK, US, Australia show that key enabling factors such as the investment climate, domestic resource mobilization, blended and innovative financing, capacity building, marine spatial planning, gender considerations (where many of the jobs in some sectors like fisheries are located) at scale were critical for building full-fledged and well-functioning sustainable ocean economies in an integrated and holistic way and without harming the carrying and ecological capacity of the country.

Expected Action:

Panelists and discussants will provide information from international experience on the development of the ocean economy in the context of climate change.

Documentation: 

 

Australia Maritime Nation Strategy:
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EU Blue Growth Strategy:
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Mauritius Roadmap and plans for the ocean economy:
Download >> 


Sweden Maritime Strategy:
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USA National Policy for the Stewardship of the Ocean, Our Coasts, and the Great Lakes:
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World Bank Mauritius – Systematic Country Diagnostic:
Download >>

Session 3: Financing

Panel 2: Spatial Planning and other Enabling Factors

Background/Objective:

Additional growth of the blue economy in Africa is possible in a number of areas, especially: fisheries, aquaculture, coastal tourism, marine biotechnology, and ocean energy. However, the narrow coastal interface however, is oversubscribed by myriad sectors, and increasingly impacted by climate change. Rising demand, ineffective governance institutions, inadequate economic incentives, technological deficits and insufficient management tools have led to inefficiently regulated or unregulated competition among users. This in turn has resulted in excessive use, and in some cases irreversible change, of valuable aquatic resources.  In this increasingly competitive space, the interests of those most dependent and vulnerable (e.g., small-scale artisanal fishermen) may be marginalized. A more systematic planning and valuation approach is important to guide sustainable and inclusive blue growth. Countries increasingly recognize that they need marine and coastal spatial planning – based on a better understanding of nationally defined priorities, social context and resource base – to ensure an efficient, sustainable and integrated management of the coastal interface, which includes both coastal as well as near shore resources.  Growing the blue economy in Africa also requires assessing the value of marine resources. Today, not only are marine living resources poorly measured and understood, they are also rarely valued. 

Expected Action:

The panel will explore key enabling factors and enablers such as marine spatial planning, capacity building, natural capital accounting, valuation of ecosystem services, etc.

Adoption of Mauritius Communiqué

Background/Objective:

The Mauritius Communiqué is the political outcome of the Conference, which may feed into future discussions on ocean and climate change, including at COP22. It will be based on the Policy Brief prepared as background to the Conference. A small team will be asked to work with a coordinator to write the Communiqué during the first day. The Communiqué will be read by the Co-Chairs of the Conference and encapsulates the essence of the discussions of the Ministerial segment. 

Outcome:

Adoption of Communiqué by acclamation

Documentation: 

Seychelles Marine Spatial Planning:
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UNEP Blue Economy: Sharing Success Stories to Inspire Change:
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UNESCO Marine Spatial Planning Initiative:
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